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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
-conscious policy violated her civil and constitutional rights. in 2003 the supreme court endorsed the use of ra as a factor in freshmen admissions. so, representative edwards, is affirmative action still necessary? >> absolutely, i think the commitment of the american dream actually rests with affirmative action, it requires it, i hope the supreme court does the right thing. >> i think that we're looking at different neutral different alternatives in talking about these issues on affirmative action. >> yeah, i agree. unfortunately until we start making serious changes in education system and i think it's necessary, affirmative action is necessary for inclusion and for diverse environment in the university system. >> i think 'farmtive action has become a crutch that we aren't revisiting education and how we're failing so many of our kids. until we do that maybe we do need it but i think we have failed our kids by not improving education. >> there was a very interesting article in "the atlantic" which is progressive publication talking about how affirmative action was giving higher scores to lati
other political ends as i describe, it was always republicans pushing civil rights legislation, being blocked by democrats for five minutes in 1964 democrats pretended to care about black people, and then they just started slapping the civil rights label on causes having nothing to do with black people and, in fact, often opposed to black people. megyn: in today's day and age, i think the assumption is that democratic policies are better for blacks -- [laughter] because they believe in affirmative action, and today believe in sort of a hand up, and a lot of blacks are struggling in lower socioeconomic neighborhoods. and they believe democrats are empathetic to that situation. that's the line. >> that is certainly the line, and it is absolutely untrue. i mean, four years of obama there was an article going around yesterday on the drudge report that four years of obama has virtually wiped out the black middle class. that's just the economic point. never be fooled into thinking that what democrats care about is the poor, the elderly, minorities. what they care about are government sector
. >> we're not being responded to a crisis that is now even to the point of a civil rights crisis. >> reporter: the issues revolve around the more than 1,000 units located off university boulevard in languageley park inside the bedford station and newborn square parts. they were acquired and out of town investment bank. it is managed by the group with offices in the west and midwest. >> partially bordered businesses are only part of it. they say they've had reports of lead poisoning due to the paint inside the apartments. bed bugs and other infestations. they're saying the only way to get management to respond to them is to take them to court. sandra lopez said her floors have been stripped to the support beams for a year now. the work to replace the floors started, then stopped. you can see through the holes in the floor to the apartment beneath because it is missing a ceiling. >> and one of the other men that live here, he was standing there and he almost fell through because of the huge hole. so that's what is covering that up. >> reporter: then there are the complaints about t
employers and he listed his jobs as constitutional law professor and civil rights attorney. he described his work as talked a lot, wrote a memoir about my identity crisis. he was also little sketchy about the years 1985 through 1987, saying it was hard to remember who he actually worked for. but he did say he was a community organizer and his job description was described as organizing people and to train people to organize. for education, he listed occidental college, columbia university, and harvard law. listed his grades is not available. his interests were basketball, marxist literature, writing about myself, talking about myself, making money, and saving the world. and the mainstream media fell in love with this highly qualified applicant. they fell in love with him because they liked the trifecta of the first black male liberal president. it didn't hurt that he went to the college is that the mainstream media adored. sarah palin attended all kinds of colleges, she was a sportscaster, helped her husband, became mayor, and one becoming the first woman to serve as government in the state'
's political activities from a fairly young age. >> narrator: his dad thought civil rights were worth fighting for. as a teenager, mitt was less interested in the issues than being with his dad. >> the word from his family is that he was not necessarily interested in politics as ideology. but there was always something about his father and his father's power and his father's profession that kept him around and kept him close in a way that it didn't do that for other members of his family. (newsreel music plays) >> the eyes of the nation are on san francisco as the republican party convenes to nominate its choice for president. >> narrator: and in 1964, mitt traveled with his dad to watch him take on conservative republican senator barry goldwater. >> the republican party should unequivocally repudiate extremists of the right and the left, and reject their efforts to infiltrate or attach themselves to our party or its candidates. >> mitt is absorbing all of this. he sees his father basically taking a stand and admires his father greatly for this. >> narrator: but it was barry goldwater's conven
, with civil unions, i would support repealing the marriage yet giving civil-rights to those who are of same-sex orientation. >> i support marriage equality. i was on an airplane last spring when i -- when a man sitting next to me started a conversation and said that he recruits for new hampshire's business and marriage equality is a major recruitment tool for him because people are going to our state because we want to include all people of talent and energy in our economy. on this, along with the issues surrounding women's health care, women's access to cancer screening and the funding of planned parenthood has extreme agenda pin he will sign those bills should they come to his desk as gov.. >> i think the record is very clear as far as what the agenda should be. it should be about jobs and the economy. that is what people have said in this state. that is the focus i will bring. i will be a leader for a change here in new hampshire, working with our legislature to get a right agenda set and the right agenda is about jobs and the economy. >> earlier this evening, a coin flip was held to see
tribe members to the reservation. a rather and curious howard noticed that his right arm is gone. he had amputated during the civil war. insert a very hard with two of his grandsons, all of whom have fallen into military service. this is very, very late in life for him. and then finally i'm ultimately, a group shot that shows howard sitting right there, along with all the great white men who at the time formed the visiting board for bowdoin college. josh malone chamberlain, who also was a renowned civil war service is also shown in this picture. he is right there. so those are the two gentlemen. chamberlin and howard were two years apart. chamberlain was five for 52, howard class of 50. they came to have not interacted much when they were here. they do share a dorm, but not a dorm room. so we didn't know too much in the early years about whether they were friendly. certainly later in life they were. and then finally, a picture of howard along with other distinguished alums, including chief justice fuller, who was seated next to howard they are, who is also a member of the board at the ti
. >> they do that, don't they, with torture? right. does that make it better? >> criminal is very different from civil. and what we -- the precise argument we are making here is that the presumption against application of u.s. law to conduct within foreign sovereigns -- and remember, the purpose of the presumption, justice scalia, is to avoid conflict with foreign sovereigns. there is no foreign sovereign over the high seas. the conflict arises, and the presumption protects against this conflict, when we go into a foreign nation, we project our law. >> i understand that. that's the worst. but i really don't -- you appeal to the general principle of territoriality of our laws. and, as i say, i don't know any other case where that principle allows our securities laws to be applied on the high seas, for example -- >> well -- >> even though they can apply in australia. >> your honor, if you wish to say no extraterritorial application, we think sosa does not foreclose that, because sosa simply said piracy might be one of the actions covered. but i want to get back to the key point, which is -- >
be seen again in the history of civilization. climate changes are not imaginary, not theoretical, not based on computer models. it's right there in front of you. >> there is more at bill moyers.com. i'll see you there and i'll see moyers.com. i'll see you there and i'll see you here next time. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com de nrns don't wait a week. to get more moyers visit bill moyers.com for exclusive blogs, essays and video features. this episode is available on dvd for $19.95. to order call or write to the address on your screen. funding is provided by carnegie corporation of new york celebrating 100 years of philanthropy and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the coalberg foundation. independent production fund with support from the partridge foundation. a john and poly guf charitable fund. the cle meant foundation. park foundation dedicated to heightening public awareness of public issues. the herb alpert foundation. the bernard and audrey rapoport foundation. the john d. and kathryn t. mcarthur foundation committed to build a more peaceful wor
and rivers that run the right way but that was true for thousands of years and didn't leave it to the development of what we think of as the united states. it wasn't until the european civilization a rise and began to make use of those harbors and rivers they were obvious so help us think about why it's the geography we spoke upon based to the cultural with the supposition one aspect. >> phyllis do ha and -- that was unable to cross across a land of the voyages of the development of technology will let shortened the distance it did not negate geography. it needed more precious and important as it opened up a new geography to the world conflict system and world trade system. culture and economics and people flow from the geography because what is culture? the accumulated experience of people on the landscape over hundreds of thousands of years that leads to the traditions and habits that can be identifiable. one of the places i have the a identifiable culture is remaining. nobody can mistake that there is a remaining culture that's been formed by the conflict between the inva
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)

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